Portrait Artist Forum    

Go Back   Portrait Artist Forum > Artists of the Past


Reply
 
Topic Tools Search this Topic Display Modes
Old 07-09-2008, 02:20 PM   #51
David Draime David Draime is offline
Juried Member
 
David Draime's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: Perris, CA
Posts: 498



Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Dransfield
Don't you look at lilly ponds and haystacks in a different way after Monet? Can you really say the same after B?
After seeing a B painting, I certainly look at my own work in a different way: it sucks!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 02:24 PM   #52
Michael Georges Michael Georges is offline
PAINTING PORTRAITS
FROM LIFE MODERATOR

FT Professional
 
Michael Georges's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2001
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 846
So this piece is called Laocoon and his Sons. It was likely sculpted before 100BC. It was unearthed around the time of Michelangelo's birth and toured around europe - it is likely that Michelangelo and many of the artists of his time saw this sculpture which was regarded to be the pinnacle of artistic endeavor...1,500 years before...

Now imagine if someone had taken Michelangelo to this sculpture and said to him,

"This has been done before. Perfection has already been achieved and you might as well not even try to tread this old ground again."

Can you imagine our world without the Pieta? Without the David?

Perfection in stone had already been achieved 1500 years before Michelangelo was even born...

I think you are painting with too broad a brush here Peter. There is merit in many artistic paths, and each path has its own challenges and rewards. Granted, each will speak to different people as they view the works from those artists.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Michael Georges
www.fineportraitsinoil.com
Michael's Life Drawing & Painting Blog

Regular and consistent work from life will improve your portraits.
Drawing skills are the foundation of all an artist does.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 03:01 PM   #53
Christy Talbott Christy Talbott is offline
Juried Member
 
Christy Talbott's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 197
This argument fascinates...

My favorite painting (at the moment) has terrible technique and is loaded with idyllic fantasy and sentiment. I love it anyway! Chagall's Promenade.

Hope you all wrap this argument up soon, because it interests me and I keep checking my computer. And I've really got work to do!!

Later,
Christy
__________________
christytalbott.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 03:17 PM   #54
Peter Dransfield Peter Dransfield is offline
Inactive
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Malaga, Spain
Posts: 91
Michelangelo was an artist of the renaissance during which artists were breaking from the conventions imposed by the Catholic Church and rediscovering the naturalism of the Greeks and Romans not only in the visual arts but following the capture of Islamic libraries in Cordoba and Seville of Philosophy and theatre. It was new to them after centuries of conformity and limitations regarding how the human figure could be portrayed following the disaster of the Iconoclasts. B lived several unbroken centuries after Michelangelo and chose to build nothing new and that was precisely the point that artists from Courbet to Monet were making.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 03:18 PM   #55
Peter Dransfield Peter Dransfield is offline
Inactive
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Malaga, Spain
Posts: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christy Talbott
This argument fascinates...

My favorite painting (at the moment) has terrible technique and is loaded with idyllic fantasy and sentiment. I love it anyway! Chagall's Promenade.

Hope you all wrap this argument up soon, because it interests me and I keep checking my computer. And I've really got work to do!!

Later,
Christy
Have you visited the Opera House in Paris?
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 04:00 PM   #56
Michael Georges Michael Georges is offline
PAINTING PORTRAITS
FROM LIFE MODERATOR

FT Professional
 
Michael Georges's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2001
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 846
You know, and it is wonderful that a group of artists were able to make the leap to impressionism and succeed at it. But just because Beaugereau did not hear that particular call in -his- art does not make his work unworthy of appreciation, and certainly does not warrant dismissal, IMO.

I for one see in his work, a focused lens of perspective that I think no painter in history had before him. It is expressed not only in his facility for creating incredible visual illusion that stops you dead in your tracks, but also in his ability to create freshness in allegory, fable, and the fantastic.
__________________
Michael Georges
www.fineportraitsinoil.com
Michael's Life Drawing & Painting Blog

Regular and consistent work from life will improve your portraits.
Drawing skills are the foundation of all an artist does.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 04:41 PM   #57
Peter Dransfield Peter Dransfield is offline
Inactive
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Malaga, Spain
Posts: 91
Now as a portrait painter I look at Bouguereau with a self-interested eye seeing what I can learn as I do at many artists. I will not have him on my walls but I have no shame in seeing how he painted flesh just as I look at Klimt, Lucien Freud and others - for the rest we will have to agree to differ.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 07:46 PM   #58
Marvin Mattelson Marvin Mattelson is offline
SOG Member
FT Professional
'04 Merit Award PSA
'04 Best Portfolio PSA
'03 Honors Artists Magazine
'01 Second Prize ASOPA
Perm. Collection- Ntl. Portrait Gallery
Perm. Collection- Met
Leads Workshops
 
Marvin Mattelson's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2002
Location: Great Neck, NY
Posts: 1,093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Dransfield
Never heard of them Marvin and I have studied art history - I presume they are minor artists who might have a local influence but hardly world shakers.
You presume? Quite the compelling argument! Peter do you actually believe that having never heard of something is reasonable cause for assuming it's insignificance? How could any artist, unknown to you, be any good, let alone great? I have no response.

I think this discussion has gotten to the point of pointlessness. Christy, you can now go back to work.
__________________
Marvin Mattelson
http://www.fineartportrait.com
marvin@fineartportrait.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2008, 09:03 PM   #59
Chris Saper Chris Saper is offline
SENIOR MODERATOR
SOG Member
FT Professional, Author
'03 Finalist, PSofATL
'02 Finalist, PSofATL
'02 1st Place, WCSPA
'01 Honors, WCSPA
Featured in Artists Mag.
 
Chris Saper's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 2,481
Peter,

Healthy discussions and debate about art are more than acceptable. That you have decided that your opinion of any of our members' work - in this case, Marvin's- has a place in this discussion is clearly misplaced.

Since you have been reading the forum posts for two years, it should be pretty clear that if Marvin, or any of our other members, wanted to hear opinions about their work, they'd have posted in the critiques section. Even in that venue, critiques are expected to offer constructive, helpful input, not relate to personal tastes of the viewer.

And I agree, this thread has reached a point of pointlessness.

Surely you understand the notion of ad hominem argument.
__________________
www.ChrisSaper.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2008, 06:03 AM   #60
Peter Dransfield Peter Dransfield is offline
Inactive
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Malaga, Spain
Posts: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Saper
Peter,

Healthy discussions and debate about art are more than acceptable. That you have decided that your opinion of any of our members' work - in this case, Marvin's- has a place in this discussion is clearly misplaced.

Since you have been reading the forum posts for two years, it should be pretty clear that if Marvin, or any of our other members, wanted to hear opinions about their work, they'd have posted in the critiques section. Even in that venue, critiques are expected to offer constructive, helpful input, not relate to personal tastes of the viewer.

And I agree, this thread has reached a point of pointlessness.

Surely you understand the notion of ad hominem argument.
Have I entered the twilight zone? I understand the term ad hominim all too well but how is it relevant here since I have only praised Marvin's work which I like very much? I am genuinely confused.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing this Topic: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Topic Tools Search this Topic
Search this Topic:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

Make a Donation



Support the Forum by making a donation or ordering on Amazon through our search or book links..







All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.