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Old 04-06-2005, 03:34 PM   #1
Lani Powell Lani Powell is offline
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Varnish drying time.




How long after I varnish a painting with Damar gloss varnish should I instruct the client to wait before framing the painting?
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Old 04-07-2005, 04:48 PM   #2
Carlos Ygoa Carlos Ygoa is offline
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Lani,

Welcome to the forum--just saw your introductory post over at the other section.
In my experience with Damar, the painting becomes touch dry after about 15 minutes, so it can pretty much be handled after that. In any case, I do not use Damar until after about 4-6 months after the painting is completed, to allow the paint films to thoroughly dry first. Before submission to the client I usually apply retouch varnish to bring the painting together as a whole and to give it an even finish. This has an even quicker drying time, so the client can proceed to the framing process immediately. The damar ritual is part of my sort of "after sales service" to the client (if the client is, of course, within reasonable distance from me).
Hope to see your work soon.

your fellow computer challenged member,
Carlos
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Old 04-07-2005, 06:00 PM   #3
Lani Powell Lani Powell is offline
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Thanks!

These will indeed be two paintings that have been "home" with the clients for a 4-6 months and which are being varnished by me in a "special personal service" kind of way.

In the past, I have used spray Damar gloss varnish, which dries so fast I didn't give it another thought. I have since then tried applying varnish with a brush on a still life (like a big time grown up artist) and I found the finish to be much more beautiful and so I want to do that for these folks.

I take it from your advice that by the time I return these paintings, two days after they've been varnished, that I can advise the clients to go ahead and frame away. Thanks for the help! This forum is great.

By the way, do you know if that holds true if I choose to try Gamblin Gamvar instead of Damar varnish?
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Old 04-07-2005, 08:46 PM   #4
Claudemir Bonfim Claudemir Bonfim is offline
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Welcome Lani, hope to see some of your work soon.

And Carlos, why do you use specifically Damar to varnish?
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Old 04-08-2005, 07:26 AM   #5
Carlos Ygoa Carlos Ygoa is offline
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Lani,
Sorry, I have no experience with Gamblin Gamvar, so I wouldn't know if it has the same properties as damar.
Claudemir,
I use the damar because I find it brushes on easily because it is relatively non-viscous, and I read somewhere that it is the best of the soft resins to use as a varnish. I prepare my own (huge savings) and I also use a little of it mixed with my medium at times to quicken drying time of the oils. As a varnish it can discolour if the resin is not too pure, though, but some might like the aged look it gives.

Carlos
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Old 04-08-2005, 06:49 PM   #6
Michael Georges Michael Georges is offline
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I use Gamvar for all my paintings. It dries within an hour and you can frame the next day if you need to. I might recommend waiting a couple of days for it to completely harden if you can though.
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Old 04-08-2005, 07:53 PM   #7
Lani Powell Lani Powell is offline
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Thanks Michael (Mr. Georges?),

I had read other posts by you on the subject of varnish and I noted that you had found Damar to yellow and that you had recommended Gamvar. Went today to the local art supply house and they don't carry it. They recommended, and I purchased, Winsor & Newton Artists' Gloss Varnish as I like a glossy finish. Do you know if that is the Winsor & Newton equivalent to Gamvar, and if so, do you think it will dry as quickly, and can therefore be framed as quickly???

If I'd gotten an MFA, would I know this stuff??
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Old 04-08-2005, 08:23 PM   #8
Michael Georges Michael Georges is offline
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Hey Lani:

I don't know this for absolute sure, but I believe the W&N varnish is also a synthetic, like the Gamvar. The benefit that the synthetics give you is that they are easier to remove down the road, and are supposed to not yellow as much over time. Time will tell on that claim as they are not yet old enough to prove the claim in anything other than lab testing.

I find that I don't like the high gloss that they impart, so I cut mine with beeswax to knock it down a bit. As you like the gloss, it should work nicely for you.

On your last question, it would depend on where you got your MFA....

Michael
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Old 04-09-2005, 07:24 AM   #9
Claudemir Bonfim Claudemir Bonfim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlos Ygoa
Lani,
Sorry, I have no experience with Gamblin Gamvar, so I wouldn't know if it has the same properties as damar.
Claudemir,
I use the damar because I find it brushes on easily because it is relatively non-viscous, and I read somewhere that it is the best of the soft resins to use as a varnish. I prepare my own (huge savings) and I also use a little of it mixed with my medium at times to quicken drying time of the oils. As a varnish it can discolour if the resin is not too pure, though, but some might like the aged look it gives.

Carlos
Thanks for that Carlos. I had never payed atention to the composition of my varnish before.
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