Portrait Artist Forum    

Go Back   Portrait Artist Forum > Lighting & Photographing for Portraiture


Reply
 
Topic Tools Display Modes
Old 12-29-2001, 10:01 PM   #11
Renee Brown Renee Brown is offline
Associate Member
FT Pro 5 yrs
 
Renee Brown's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: East Northport, NY
Posts: 74



Karin,

Not reflector boards. This kind. Is this reflector a good buy or not needed with the ultra zap? I guess this would be used with the modeling lamp.

Thanks.
Renee

Special Offer On
20" Reflector
Only $40
LIMITED SUPPLY / Last of inventory !
Place Order
With a spring mounted bounce plate, these white pan reflectors are designed for Ultra, UltraZAP and X-Series lights with any modeling lamp. A 80
Attached Images
 
__________________
www.ReneeBrown.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2002, 09:29 AM   #12
Renee Brown Renee Brown is offline
Associate Member
FT Pro 5 yrs
 
Renee Brown's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: East Northport, NY
Posts: 74
Karin, or anyone,

What's the difference between a photobulb ($8.95) and a "modeling light" ($27.95)? Also, before I spend over $300. on the ultra zap, why isn't the modeling light enough? I don't get what the additional light from the strobe does? Is the strobe mostly to provide enough light to fill?

I feel that I am going to need to take a studio lighting course soon!

Renee
__________________
www.ReneeBrown.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2002, 09:53 AM   #13
Karin Wells Karin Wells is offline
FT Pro, Mem SOG,'08 Cert Excellence PSA, '02 Schroeder Portrait Award Copley Soc, '99 1st Place PSA, '98 Sp Recognition Washington Soc Portrait Artists, '97 1st Prize ASOPA, '97 Best Prtfolio ASOPA
 
Karin Wells's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
Location: Peterborough, NH
Posts: 1,114
That 20" reflector pictured above would indeed soften the light - but might be bulky to travel with. However, for that price.....

The modeling light will show you where the light falls and defines your shadows. Remember that shadow patterns are an important design and composition element.

The modeling light is too weak to use alone with your camera settings. The strobe plugs into the camera, overrides the modeling light when it flashes, captures the image, and insures that you can capture on film what you actually see.

The strobe is necessary if you are photographing children or animals. (i.e., Your subject does not need to sit very still - good with adults too).

In a pinch, I have used a regular light bulb in place of the modeling light....but prefer the bulb suggested by the manufacturer.

Basically all the advice in the world won't substitute for experimentation and finding out what works best for your individual needs.

Theoretically natural lighting is best but I live in a place where the weather does not cooperate and I really need studio lighting that I can count on.
__________________
Karin Wells

www.KarinWells.com

www.KarinWells.BlogSpot.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2002, 09:12 AM   #14
Renee Brown Renee Brown is offline
Associate Member
FT Pro 5 yrs
 
Renee Brown's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: East Northport, NY
Posts: 74
UZ 800 light and The background in a Bag

Karin, I just sent off the order for the Ultra Zap 800 light, and the stands for the background in a Bag just arrived.

Wow, are the stands heavy! Do you carry all this equipment to your clients' homes or do you have it all set up in your studio?

Btw, when my light arrives, expect some offlist "Help me!" posts to arrive from yours truly!

I am still trying to figure out my new Sony digital camera! So many modes, so little time.

Renee
__________________
www.ReneeBrown.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2002, 10:38 AM   #15
Renee Brown Renee Brown is offline
Associate Member
FT Pro 5 yrs
 
Renee Brown's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: East Northport, NY
Posts: 74
Karin, Hi. I have been very busy painting.and haven't even had time to read through my ultra zap manual. Could you give me the settings for the back of my ultra zap lamp that you usually use?

I had to photograph these brothers outside in the cold a couple of weeks ago. We nearly froze! I've been taking in new commissions and I hate reading manuals and would appreciate the help. Thanks.

Renee
Attached Images
 
__________________
www.ReneeBrown.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2002, 02:10 PM   #16
Karin Wells Karin Wells is offline
FT Pro, Mem SOG,'08 Cert Excellence PSA, '02 Schroeder Portrait Award Copley Soc, '99 1st Place PSA, '98 Sp Recognition Washington Soc Portrait Artists, '97 1st Prize ASOPA, '97 Best Prtfolio ASOPA
 
Karin Wells's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
Location: Peterborough, NH
Posts: 1,114
On my White Lightning strobe, I set the slider on the back to 1/2 power and keep my model light on at all times.

This setting may or may not work for you depending on your ambient light, distance from subject, etc.

Reading the manual (and taking notes) will be worth the time and effort it takes. Expect to experiment a LOT and Good luck!

BTW, this is a really cute pose for the little children's portrait, but beware of open mouths with teeth showing...this can be tricky (to say the least) to paint. Also, maybe this ought to be a vertical painting rather than a horizontal one?

I think that this kind of picture is best posed in a studio with controlled lighting...much less of a hassle to paint...
__________________
Karin Wells

www.KarinWells.com

www.KarinWells.BlogSpot.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2002, 05:02 PM   #17
Renee Brown Renee Brown is offline
Associate Member
FT Pro 5 yrs
 
Renee Brown's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: East Northport, NY
Posts: 74
Karin, Thanks for the quick tip on the light. At least I can give it a try. I know there's no avoiding the manual, but I have been so busy painting that this quick lesson will help me for now. I took one look at all those controls and groaned. I detest learning new technology everytime I buy something new. Just finally figured out my new digital camera.

Yes, that was my first thought as well, to paint this vertically but the client overrode my suggestion. Plus, he wanted the big smiles and I am pretty good with downplaying the teeth, so off we go. These kids are so sweet , the job is a pleasure, not to mention it went for a good price.

I have to say that Chris Saper's new book is a great help. I finally am getting that "shadow" means cool not dark. Whew. That finally sank in. Thanks Chris.

Renee
__________________
www.ReneeBrown.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2002, 10:42 PM   #18
Joan Breckwoldt Joan Breckwoldt is offline
Associate Member
 
Joan Breckwoldt's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2001
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 504
New lighting equipment

Renee,

Hi, I have been reading through the posts you and Karin exchanged about lighting. I am wondering how your new system is working out?

I don't even have a digital camera so that is the first thing I am tring to research. A couple of months ago I tried to figure out a simple 'studio light' system but after visiting a couple of camera stores here in Houston I decided I didn't know enough to even know what I need. Oh, I also felt like I needed some kind of photography degree to get it all figured out. I would appreciate any suggestions from anybody that reads this too.

Thanks,
Joan
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2002, 09:21 PM   #19
Renee Brown Renee Brown is offline
Associate Member
FT Pro 5 yrs
 
Renee Brown's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: East Northport, NY
Posts: 74
Joan, Hi. I have this commission going and today put three new figurative entries into a local art show. I have to get a painting of Central Park ready for a gallery by May 3rd. I am lucky I finally understand my new Sony cybershot p50 (don't buy it) enough to get good shots out of it. It takes awful shots of paintings but fabulous pics of family.

On my "must figure out" list is the George Foreman grill my sis-in-law gave us for Christmas, The ultra zap light, and three other things that require reading the instructions. Our world is filled with new technology and I am running to catch up! I'll let you know asap.

The first and simplest lamps I bought before I purchased a Bogen stand (love it!!) were the Smith-Vector lights from B & H photo, NYC. They are simple 13 foot light stands and with a 200 watt photobulb are simple to use, approx. $120. for the set.

Now the spring is here and I am out in the park again, painting plein air. I am all over the place when it comes to art and I still haven't decided what kind of an artist I'll be when I grow up!!

Renee
__________________
www.ReneeBrown.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2002, 09:25 PM   #20
Renee Brown Renee Brown is offline
Associate Member
FT Pro 5 yrs
 
Renee Brown's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: East Northport, NY
Posts: 74
Here's the commission so far. This was photographed in dim lighting so the parents could see the details. They love it so far.
Renee
Attached Images
 
__________________
www.ReneeBrown.com
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing this Topic: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Topic Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

Make a Donation



Support the Forum by making a donation or ordering on Amazon through our search or book links..







All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.