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Old 04-22-2004, 06:04 PM   #21
Mike Dodson Mike Dodson is offline
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Allan,

12"-15" sounds like a pretty optimal size to me. Mine are 8" and works great for taking an 8 x 10 up to a 16 x 20. As I mentioned earlier, I use center line cross hairs for reference so I don't need, say for example, a full 10" to draw a full size head. 5" on the large end would be enough. The 8" set I have will open comfortably to 10-3/8" on the largest end. I'll try to post a picture of the set I made tonight to give you an idea. I made mine out of hardwood dowels.
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Old 04-22-2004, 06:32 PM   #22
Geary Wootten Geary Wootten is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan Rahbek
If cheating is all, I wonder why so few come up with results !!!!!!!

Gear, this is not meant for you, but you inspired me to do this conclusion.

Thanks Allan.

No, no, no....no worries Alan. LOL.....I am TOTALLY feelin ya man. Keep it up, dude!

If Michelangelo had to use pounce patterns.....then dang it......I'm gonna use pouce patterns!



-geeDub
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Old 04-22-2004, 10:38 PM   #23
Chris Saper Chris Saper is offline
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I've moved this thread to the "Methods of seing", as it seemed better placed here.
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Old 04-23-2004, 07:49 AM   #24
Mike Dodson Mike Dodson is offline
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My Proportional Dividers

These are my 8" homemade dividers. They are made from hardwood dowels. The inside portions that make contact with each other are sanded flat.
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Old 04-23-2004, 04:32 PM   #25
Allan Rahbek Allan Rahbek is offline
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" The Tool"

I have made my Proportional Dividers from two flat beech sticks ( for stirring paint ) .1" wide x 3/16" thick x 12" long. Total length, including the iron nails, is 13".

7 different positions for the axis, to measure from 1" : 1 3/16" to 1" : 3 1/2"
Hole NR. 4 measures 1" : 2" and it will reach 15" with the long legs.

Allan
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Old 04-23-2004, 05:51 PM   #26
Garth Herrick Garth Herrick is offline
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Sculpture proportional dividers

Hi Mike and Allan,

I thought I'd add my 2 cents worth. Here are a pair of dividers I made specifically to copy from fired clay scale to wet clay scale, about 12.5%. They will take inside and outside measurements. The wood is basswood model making stock from an art supply store. Length: 23 inches. Maximum measurement: 23.5 inches.

Same principal as your divider examples, just larger and for 3-D work.

Conceivably, although I have not tried this yet, these dividers could be used for painting from a live model/sitter, either to copy in direct scale, or 112.5%, or 88.8%.

Garth
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Old 04-24-2004, 07:34 PM   #27
Sharon Knettell Sharon Knettell is offline
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Hi,

I work both from life and photos.

I use the grid method for photos as I like to elongate my figures, especially the standing ones. I use an 8 head reference as opposed to a 7.5 head measurement.

I use the head length as my basic unit of measurement and create grids relating to that size. The head is one grid unit, the armpits two, the waist three, the crotch four, mid-thigh five, kneecap bottom six, mid-calf seven, weight-bearing heel eight. I extend the grid horizontally as well.

This way of measurement is usefull for standing figures from life as well. For figures that are seated, I use the sight-size method. I find photos really distort seated figures, even with good portrait lenses.

I do my initial drawing smaller than the painting I intend to do as I work rather large. I do an accurate outline of my study, and have what is known as a "shaco" made. It is a linear enlargement, it is what architechs use. It is not a blueprint, but a nice black and white outline on paper. They can print it on transparent vellum as well. I then trace this to my canvas or panel.

I hope this helps.
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Old 04-25-2004, 06:26 PM   #28
Joan Breckwoldt Joan Breckwoldt is offline
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Grid method

"I use the grid method for photos as I like to elongate my figures, especially the standing ones."


Sharon, what do you mean by elongating the figure? Do you mean the height proportion is exaggerated? Hmm, this is an interesting if I understand your meaning correctly. Thank you for that bit of information.

Joan
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Old 04-26-2004, 12:04 PM   #29
Sharon Knettell Sharon Knettell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joan Breckwoldt
"I use the grid method for photos as I like to elongate my figures, especially the standing ones."


Sharon, what do you mean by elongating the figure? Do you mean the height proportion is exaggerated? Hmm, this is an interesting if I understand your meaning correctly. Thank you for that bit of information.

Joan
Joan,

I have actually addressed these proportions on another thread and being computer illiterate, it would be hard for me to find them.

If you measure the Sargent standing figures you will find that these proportons apply in most of them. They give a figure a more "elance" and elegant look. Great for slimming down subtly those of us who are a bit zaftig.

These are proportions used frequently in classic painting and sculpture. Sometimes regular proportions can make even a slim figure look squat in a painting or a picture, that is why they hire all those really skinny tall models!

The proportions are as follows:

Head one: the head, the neck is 1/3 the head length
Head two: to the armpits
Head three: to the waist
Head four: to the crotch
Head five: to the mid-thigh
Head six: to the bottom of the kneecap
Head seven: to mid-calf
Head eight: to the bottom of the weight bearing leg

Try it!
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Old 04-26-2004, 12:17 PM   #30
Jean Kelly Jean Kelly is offline
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Sharon,

When I was 13 years old, I was planning on becoming a fashion designer and illustrator. I found a book on fashion illustrating that suggested what you talk about here. So I drew and drew, all my figures and designs were eight heads tall. When I got to college, my life drawing professor said, "Draw what you see, Jean! Is that model really that long???" Go figure.

Jean
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