Portrait Artist Forum    

Go Back   Portrait Artist Forum > Methods of Seeing


Reply
 
Topic Tools Display Modes
Old 11-21-2002, 03:43 AM   #1
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
Juried Member
FT Professional
 
Lon Haverly's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland
Posts: 698
Line first method




I have found myself using what I have come to call, for lack of a better term, "line first" method of drawing, which simply is drawing the subject one line at a time with the focus on the accuracy of the line more than the overall form. If each line is right, the form will be right. It is a very fast way to draw, since it cuts down on mistakes. It is a way of seeing your subject with quick glances from the subject to the drawing, and a very analytical way to draw.

Line first places the emphasis on the accuracy, style, thickness, angle and intensity of each line, rather than just the shape of the final form. Many artists scribble their way to a form, and in the process, ignore the quality of line, resulting in a poorly executed drawing.

I have a strict procedure that I use which guides me through the drawing to a completed form, but in the process, I make each line count. Many times, I never draw the line more than once. It is a very economic way to draw, and really a must when you do as I do, draw ten to twenty minute sketches from life day in and day out.
__________________
Lon Haverly www.lonhaverly.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2002, 07:00 PM   #2
Enzie Shahmiri Enzie Shahmiri is offline
Associate Member
SoCal-ASOPA Founder
FT Professional
 
Enzie Shahmiri's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2002
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
Posts: 1,395
Lon, a long time ago, I believe it was the Renaissance, the prevailing respect for an artist
__________________
Enzie Shahmiri
Professional Portrait Artist
Founder of Southern California Society of Portrait Artists
Portfolio
Facebook
World Market Portraits Blog
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2002, 01:15 PM   #3
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
Juried Member
FT Professional
 
Lon Haverly's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland
Posts: 698
Drawing a line is a different world than painting. But drawing has a big impact on painting. Line first drawing helps you with your confidence. It crosses over into painting when you apply the same careful and artful approach to your brush. In painting, you want each stroke to count as well. Some people like to go over and over their oil painting. I do not. I suppose that it why I do not underpaint much, except to lay out the form with my brush. I am not really much of an art student, tho, who studies how other people have done it. I just do it. I don't know about art history or art appreciation, or all the methodology there is out there. All I know is what I have learned from experience, not from books.
__________________
Lon Haverly www.lonhaverly.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2002, 10:28 AM   #4
Julianne Lowman Julianne Lowman is offline
Juried Member
FT Pro
 
Julianne Lowman's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2002
Location: Decatur, AL
Posts: 144
Send a message via AIM to Julianne Lowman
Lon, can you show an example of this concept?
__________________
Julianne Lowman
www.LowmanArt.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2002, 03:31 AM   #5
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
Juried Member
FT Professional
 
Lon Haverly's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland
Posts: 698
Somewhere on this site is a drawing of a spaniel pup I drew in about five minutes. It was drawn one stroke style, or line first. I made each line only once, but carefully. It is just a mind set. It is placing greater importance on each line and its style, strength, direction and flare. If every line is correct, the drawing will be correct. Right? Well, hopefully. That is the idea, anyway. It works well for me, in the short sketch venu. I think some people have a different mind set when they start a subject. They go for the form with little regard to the style of lines that they make. Not that that is wrong. It is just a different approach. Some call it gesture drawing. You scribble out the form, then define it more and more as you go with the overall form in mind rather than the lines. This method, gesture, works well if you are drawing out of your imagination without any reference to look at. Your very gestured lines become the reference. Line first is just a term which I use to describe the opposite of gesture drawing, which is, you might say, form first.

I consider line first a primary discipline worthy of any beginner's training, as well as gesture. Too often, line is sadly neglected. I was taught it at a very early age, but it was not coined in that phrase.

I am really not much of a painter, but I am working on it. I draw, and will paint if asked to. My painting has taken a turn for the better since I have been a part of this Forum. Thank you, Cynthia.
__________________
Lon Haverly www.lonhaverly.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2002, 08:44 AM   #6
Cynthia Daniel Cynthia Daniel is offline
SOG & FORUM OWNER
 
Cynthia Daniel's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
Location: Tampa Bay, FL
Posts: 2,121
Send a message via ICQ to Cynthia Daniel Send a message via AIM to Cynthia Daniel Send a message via MSN to Cynthia Daniel Send a message via Yahoo to Cynthia Daniel
Thank you for your appreciation, Lon. Appreciation is always welcomed!
__________________
Cynthia Daniel, Owner of Forum & Stroke of Genius

www.PortraitArtist.com

  Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2002, 02:10 AM   #7
Karin Wells Karin Wells is offline
FT Pro, Mem SOG,'08 Cert Excellence PSA, '02 Schroeder Portrait Award Copley Soc, '99 1st Place PSA, '98 Sp Recognition Washington Soc Portrait Artists, '97 1st Prize ASOPA, '97 Best Prtfolio ASOPA
 
Karin Wells's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
Location: Peterborough, NH
Posts: 1,114
Lon, I think that you're on to something. This is one of my favorite artists who draws with the most supurb sensitivity and precision of line...Ingres.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Karin Wells

www.KarinWells.com

www.KarinWells.BlogSpot.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2002, 02:14 AM   #8
Karin Wells Karin Wells is offline
FT Pro, Mem SOG,'08 Cert Excellence PSA, '02 Schroeder Portrait Award Copley Soc, '99 1st Place PSA, '98 Sp Recognition Washington Soc Portrait Artists, '97 1st Prize ASOPA, '97 Best Prtfolio ASOPA
 
Karin Wells's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2001
Location: Peterborough, NH
Posts: 1,114
Here is another. I am sorry I couldn't find a closeup detail that shows the quality of his linework. I believe that both of these examples are in pencil.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Karin Wells

www.KarinWells.com

www.KarinWells.BlogSpot.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2003, 01:05 AM   #9
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
Juried Member
FT Professional
 
Lon Haverly's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland
Posts: 698
Sorry I am so long getting back to this thread. That is a very interesting example posted above, where the face is modeled in a smeared method, and the rest of the drawing is sketched more linear.

Julianne, below is a drawing (24" x 18") which utilizes lines exclusively in pencil. It had to be quick, as the models were not experienced, especially the baby. I try to make each line final, and make each line count. The line comprises everything - value, expression, everything. It is a very rewarding discipline, but one which takes a great deal of practice. I was taught the technique as a child, but did not value it until I was well into my drawing career.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Lon Haverly www.lonhaverly.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2003, 01:06 AM   #10
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
Juried Member
FT Professional
 
Lon Haverly's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Location: Gaithersburg, Maryland
Posts: 698
The image is a little over saturated. These closer shots are more telling.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Lon Haverly www.lonhaverly.com
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing this Topic: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Topic Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

Make a Donation



Support the Forum by making a donation or ordering on Amazon through our search or book links..







All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.