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Old 08-09-2005, 11:05 PM   #11
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
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For figure drawing, it doesn't hurt to be a ways away. Being too close can create forshortening problems.

But for a portrait, I cannot see how you could benefit by being any farther away than ten feet at the most. Any farther than that and you are in for frustration. Why ask for trouble?

Consistency is really the key, I think, to developing a consistent drawing technique, whatever it may be. If you always have to change your drawing environment, it will be harder to be consistent in your drawing or painting.

I am never farther than 5' from my models, unless I am in a courtroom situation. But that is wretched drawing! Wretched!
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Old 08-12-2005, 02:55 AM   #12
Debra Jones Debra Jones is offline
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But part of the thrill of studio is the Guerrilla aspect!

I have found I learn more under the less than perfect conditions. I have found myself with the light shining in my eyes and learned the elegance of back lighting. I had to train my eye to observe the colors in the shadows.

I have been far enough back to force myself to observe the planes, more than the details and what makes the likeness of a face, not the minutiae.

The exercise of sitting and observing a pose for hour after hour is the strategy you can develop of how to work against the fidget and straining muscles of the model.

I used to curse a blue streak that nobody was checking and correcting the model and then it hit me. THIS was luxury! When I was having people pay me to paint them, I know they were going to be less cooperative and much less focused. I learned to know where I was weakest and start with the structure. To decide where I wanted the eyes and nose as fast as I could and paint into that, what the model ended up doing.

I think all the stress of studio, with nothing at stake but enriching my experience, is never a waste of time.

I also enjoy the artificial light.

I assume I am the artist and it is my vision of the sitter that is going to set me apart. I have found a lot of my criticism of the studio situation or deficiencies of the model have DIRECTLY been the result of my own lack of experience as to what to do without their cooperation. I have learned how not to chase an eyeball all over a face. I have learned to pace myself and work from a beginning with a minimal effort to a middle with strong and well thought form and come to the last pose with a sense of what it will take to finish the face and save the genius strokes for exactly where they should be.

I find it a marvelous challenge. I love it the most when, after a grumpy full house of a class, I take the least attractive corner, plug myself in and have at least one novice tell me I lucked into the best position! It stretches me every time!
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Old 01-10-2009, 03:28 PM   #13
Clayton J. Beck III Clayton J. Beck III is offline
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I am at the Palette and Chisel in Chicago. As a member ($360 / year) one has available 60 plus hours of model time a week ... FREE. Many of the long pose workshops are in the large north light studio.

Without access to this, I would never have been able to afford the model time necessary to develop as a painter in my formative years and even now, as I wish to develop something specific, I come down here and work it out from the model.

ps- out-of-towners are less than a $90 / year and can come in the Chicago with full benefits of open studio.

This one was done in a open studio at the P&C a few years back.

Cara 30" x 20" Charcoal on buff colored paper
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:18 AM   #14
Cindy Procious Cindy Procious is offline
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Clayton, that is simply gorgeous.
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