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Old 10-08-2007, 01:51 PM   #1
Enzie Shahmiri Enzie Shahmiri is offline
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Ludwig Deutsch




Biography
- 1855 born in Vienna, Austria.
- 1872-1875 After high school, he entered the Academy of Fine Arts to study Classical painting with Anselm Feuerbach (1875-1877)
- 1877 When Feuerbach retired as a teacher, Deutsch and some others students attempted to enter the class of Leopold Carl M
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Old 10-08-2007, 01:56 PM   #2
Enzie Shahmiri Enzie Shahmiri is offline
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The Palace Guard (1900-02)

Signed lower left L. Deutsch
The Palace Guard (1900-02)
oil on panel/huile sur panneau
31.25x23.75in. (79.5x60.3cm)



In the present painting Deutsch is at the height of his powers. The figure of the guard exudes pride and grandeur and his pose in unyielding and commanding. This same figure appears in another work that bears the same title from 1900, which is currently in the Nadj Collection. A number of Deutsch's favorite props, such as the Indo-Persian helmet and shield as well as the exquisitely embroidered green silk fabric, appear in both compositions.

A study for the present painting illustrates the astonishingly exact and detailed planning involved. Deutsch produced many sketches and color studies before moving forward with a composition, and it is apparent that with each stage of planning and execution he aimed for perfection.

Deutsch's use of architecture is similar to a stage set, as it utilizes to help reinforce the human figure. In his composition of the palace guard, Deutsch frequently used columns, gateways, exquisitely worked masonry and marbles to accentuate the might and glory of his sitters.

Source Christie's Catalog New York April 2006, p. 36

You can find many more paintings and descriptions here

If you like me to move a certain work into this thread for further discussion, please send me an Email.
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:01 PM   #3
Cynthia Daniel Cynthia Daniel is offline
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I'm not a painter, but all I can say is "stunning!"
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:59 PM   #4
Sharon Knettell Sharon Knettell is offline
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Enzie,

Quite an accomplished painting, but I much prefer the original art of the cultures themselves, rather than the European renderings of them.

I much prefer the Savahid paintings to this, which, I must say looks like a set piece, like the Alma-Tademas, Bargues and Geromes.

The Persians had a very lyrical way of depicting their life and culture with beauty and elegance, which is lost in the over romanticized depiction of the European painters.

The art and culture of the East, Asia and Africa had a stunning and revitalizing effect on European art, from the Japonaiserie of Whistler to the Odalisques of Matisse.

In the West, academic painting worships at the fountain of form, leaving color and design as second cousins. Add ons as it were. What has been lost is engaging, rhythmic pictorial compositions and jewel-like color.

The paintings of these cultures were the inspiration of the painters of the Impressionist period. They showed that art did not have to be about the picture plane, correct rendering, but it could be joyful, lyrical and colorful all on its own.
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Old 10-09-2007, 12:47 AM   #5
Marvin Mattelson Marvin Mattelson is offline
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Deutsch treat

I think that Deutsch offers great lessons to all portrait artists. I've had the opportunity of seeing many of his paintings at the auction previews in New York. Reproductions can in no way convey the gem like quality of his compositions nor the sublety of his color.

His color schemes are quite spectacular and the way he handled flesh was first rate. Many would call him a photo realist but they would be mistaken because his paintings recreate illusionistic space and not the intrinsic flatness of photo-realism.

I think that his modeling is of the highest level possible and should serve as an inspiration to any portrait artist looking to improve the way they handle form. Those who wish to paint flatly should also study Deutsch and do the exact opposite.

Below I've posted the full composition plus a detail from Deutsch's Palace Guard.

.
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Old 10-09-2007, 10:57 AM   #6
Enzie Shahmiri Enzie Shahmiri is offline
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Cynthia, as I am uploading my collection on my blog believe I just want to crawl into a corner and weep. These paintings are so perfect in every detail rendered that I just keep thinking how will I ever get to that stage?! It's hopeless, yet so inspirational.

Sharon, you post nice Eastern art and when I have a moment I will post soem Iranian paintings other than what you have. It's just interesting to see how different cultures adapt to each other. On that subject have your read My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk? It talks about Miniaturist that are facing the request for modernization and adaptation to european painting styles. You can read more about a review I did on my blog.

Marvin, a true "tour de force" no? I heard the Dahesh has closed it's doors. Have they found a new place? Have you heard anything?
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Old 10-09-2007, 11:02 AM   #7
Enzie Shahmiri Enzie Shahmiri is offline
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A Woman From Cairo Ludwig Deutsch

Not signed but authenticated by Lynne Thornton
A Woman from Cairo Study
oil on canvas/huile sur toile
25.625x21.25in. (65x54cm)

For artist studies such as this one are valuable insights into the artist's approach to a painting. It looks like Deutsch applied paint in short strokes, similar to hatching with a pencil. The light source and play of shadows is recorded in high contrast to each other (see her right hand), very unlike the smooth value gradation we are used to seeing in his final products. This leaves me to believe that this might be a color study.
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Old 10-09-2007, 12:22 PM   #8
Thomasin Dewhurst Thomasin Dewhurst is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin Mattelson
Those who wish to paint flatly should also study Deutsch and do the exact opposite.
I disagree. The best modeling is all about transferring your visual impression of space and form onto a flat surface. At the very heart of modeling is knowing how to put paint down flatly. It is about the simple appreciation and enjoyment of the qualities of the medium and ground. The best, most alluring, most absorbing works are those whose authors essentially love the putting down of paint on canvas. That's where the difference between a convincing and an unconvincing painting lies, and why certain examples of modeling look more masterful than others.
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Old 10-09-2007, 01:21 PM   #9
Marvin Mattelson Marvin Mattelson is offline
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Spaced out

Thomisin, I don't think you're getting what I'm saying. I'm talking about controlling pictorial space.

My point was that in order to model the form (paint something so it has the illusion of three dimensional space) one needs to manipulate the values, edges, contrasts and intensities to bolster that illusion. Hard edges come forward and soft go back. If all the edges are treated similarly, then the painting looks flat not illusionistic.

Comparing Deutsch's 3-D effects with the Persian paintings clearly demonstrates the point I was making. The uniformity in intensities (within the same hues), edges and the lack of value gradation makes the Persian paintings lack the feel of pictorial depth.

It has nothing whatsoever to do with lovingly placing ones strokes. That is a whole other issue. Everyone who is into painting should be doing that. Why waste your time doing something you aren't passionate about.
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Old 10-09-2007, 05:17 PM   #10
Sharon Knettell Sharon Knettell is offline
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Pictorial space and depth! These are good criteria of what is good and bad about art?

Utter hogwash and nonsense!

How can you dismiss the art of the entire cultures of the East with one ill-informed statement!

Pictorial depth only has had relevance in the West. It is not an advance, but a point of view. It is only the chauvinism of Western perception and Western arts that sees that pictorial depth or form as entirely superior. Holy rendering, just for the sake of endless and boring rendering.
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